Our Destinies Lie In Our Own Hands

(As published on Elephant Journal as a “Staff Pick” and featured in “Popular Lately”)

Ayurveda is often thought of as being an art of living. Our life is the canvas, and our thoughts and actions are like a palette, from which we can paint any picture we wish. It has been said that as we act, so we become. Continue reading

What Goes Around

“Our Teachers in Nature” was a very beautiful passage – really nicely articulated the interconnectedness of life. How important it is to live in harmony with nature, knowing, as Ganobaji wisely pointed out, how nature is not something separate from us as individuals – we all, after all, have our own ‘natures.’  On how I was reminded of karma through this passage, I have written a poem: Continue reading

On Solitude and Renunciation

I think this Wednesday’s passage on “The Fallacy of Togetherness” really required some deeper reflection on the meaning of solitude and renunciation and their role in spirituality to have true value. There is, on the one hand, something so beautiful the Swamiji, for example, from the Sivananda Ashram in Kerala, South India, who renounced his wife and career to move to India to pursue a path of deep solitude and spiritual growth. He couldn’t speak a single word of the local dialect in India. At that time, nothing was written in English the way the language has become widespread these days. So this Swamiji befriended the birds, the monkeys and the trees of the jungle in Kerala. I think it is wonderful to have that kind of opportunity to be that close and connected to Mother Nature.

In our culture, both the western and Indian ones, as well as the European, and, I imagine, Middle Eastern and Latin American ones, we are inclined to feel great regard for those who walk a path of renunciation, by becoming Swamis or monks, priests or imams. Because we imagine that we could never live without the things these people have given up, it is natural to feel a lot of respect for renunciates. There, is however, at the same time, a darker side to renunciation of the traditional sense (as there is for all things in the dualistic world we inhabit). Continue reading