Tag Archives: teacher

3 Ancient Practices to Embrace Your Soul Power

(Originally published as a “Popular Lately,” “Featured Today Spirituality Highlight,” “Popular Yoga,” “Popular Wellness,” and “Popular Spirituality” article on Elephant Journal)

We celebrated a beautiful Vedic festival called Makar Sankranti at Vedika Global on January 14th, 2016. This festival worships the Sun as it makes its northern ascent in the sky during the first six months of the year. It is considered an auspicious way to start your educational journey and to recommit to your health and spiritual goals for the year ahead.

So many traditional societies have revered the Sun for its magnificent qualities, including the ancient Egyptian, Aztec, Buddhist, Chinese, Christian, Baltic, and Greek cultures.

The Vedic Indian tradition honors the Sun as being the symbol of health, wealth, knowledge, inner power, and the illumination of your very soul.

I have always loved the Sun. 

Even before I encountered Ayurveda, the Sun was a huge source of inspiration to me. 

Sunrises and sunsets have always captivated my heart; it never ceases to amaze me how artistic the Sun is ~ every morning and evening, it creates a brand new art exhibition, totally free of charge and open to all.  Continue reading

“The greatest journeys are the ones that bring you home.” -The Namesake film trailer

Dear Ones,

Today’s my birthday. Birthdays, like the beginning of each new year, are excellent opportunities to reflect and take stock of where we’ve been, and to see where we want to go. As it’s been a while since I’ve been in touch, I wanted to take this chance to catch you up on where I’ve been and where I’m headed.

2015 took me on many joyful journeys to share the ancient healing wisdom of Yoga and Ayurveda with different groups of amazing people.

 

My students spanned Silicon Valley seniors to Yoga enthusiasts to staff at Stanford’s Health Improvement Program to Alameda County Probation Department correctional officers to Health Technology Forum innovators to Stanford Health Care Valleycare patients to the Social Innovation Summit’s Fortune 500 executives, White House representatives, and leading social entrepreneurs.

One of the most meaningful talks I gave was on January 3, 2016, at the Hindu Temple in my hometown of Toledo, Ohio.

As the trailer of The Namesake movie says: “The greatest journeys are the ones that bring you home.”

I love The Namesake. I can completely relate to the main character, Gogol’s journey and confusion growing up between two cultures, where we stand simultaneously in a space of neither and both, perpetually searching for the meaning of “home.”

Continue reading

The Power of Resolution: 3 Healthy Habits to Cultivate in the New Year

(As published in “Staff Picks” & “Popular Lately” on Elephant Journal)

The New Year is always an exciting invitation for transformation and new beginnings.

In Sanskrit, the word “Sankalpa” means “resolve or intention,” and “Shakti” is power.” Sankalpa Shakti is, therefore, the power of resolution—which can be utilized at any moment we are seeking a more mindful approach to the unfolding of our lives.

Oftentimes, at the start of a new year, we are full of excitement at the prospect of setting often more generic resolutions, such as exercising more or eating healthier food, only to quickly discard these intentions. I myself have gone through that experience of setting generic resolutions that have soon fallen to the wayside.

I’ve learned that, for a Sankalpa to really have power, it must be thoughtfully contemplated first—as it really must come from that deepest space within ourselves, from the quiet voice of the soul, which often speaks in a whisper, when we are silent enough to listen to and heed its inner knowings.  Continue reading

How Ayurveda Inspires Mindful Eating

(As published on Elephant Journal in the “Popular Lately” section)

In a world where women are so often objectified, whether in the workplace, media, on the school bus, or the world wide web, one of the most powerful lessons from the ancient science of Ayurveda for me has been to see my body as my temple.  Continue reading

The Danger of More in Modern Yoga

(As published on Elephant Journal)

Even as Yoga explodes in popularity, its essence is being lost.

In recently performing an internet search for “Yoga in America,” I was saddened to see the latest of the slew of scandals related to Yoga (that happen not just in America, but throughout the world) appear at the top of my search results. Yoga, an ancient eight-fold practice originally designed to assist sincere spiritual seekers to access deep inner states of meditation and contemplation, seems to have become connected with a pervasive myth that more is better.

There is more music played in Yoga classes, more asanas (physical poses), more competition, more heat, more intensity, more challenging poses, more sexy clothing, more scantily clad students and teachers, more scandals.  Continue reading

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